Biomaster antimicrobial coffee cups safer to use, study shows

19
Feb

An independent study undertaken by Aston University shows that Biomaster antimicrobial technology will significantly reduce levels of harmful bacteria found on reusable coffee cups.

The popularity of reusable coffee cups has rocketed in anticipation that the government could impose a “latte tax” on disposable cups. Major coffee chains have also now started offering special discounts on drinks to incentivise the use of reusables.

However independent studies by Aston University and Public Health England have shown that reusable cups are a breeding ground for dangerous bacteria if they're not cleaned properly. The problem is worse in hot drinks containers where dairy and sugar are present, providing the perfect food source for bacteria.

Anthony Hilton

A research team from Aston measured the bacterial loading recovered from ordinary reusable coffee cups that had been subjected to daily use and a variety of cleaning regimes, then compared them with coffee cups containing Biomaster antimicrobial technology to see if they could find a reduction in levels of surface bacteria in the
treated cup.

Under all the usage profiles investigated and all of the samples tested, antimicrobial technology delivered an effective reduction in the residual level of bacteria on the external and internal lid and internal surfaces of the cup.

Anthony Hilton (left) Professor of Applied Microbiology and Deputy Executive Dean of School of Life & Health Sciences at Aston University says: “Bacteria can easily grow on the inner surfaces of a reusable coffee cup unless it is washed after use. Antimicrobial technology built into the drinking vessel significantly reduces the opportunity for bacteria to grow. 

“Our study shows that reusable coffee cups treated with antimicrobial technology are much less likely to become heavily contaminated with bacteria.“ 

Download full details of the microbial study.

 


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